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Naturwissenschaften

, Volume 87, Issue 1, pp 41–44 | Cite as

Three Ways To Be a Saber-Toothed Cat

  • L. D. Martin
  • J. P. Babiarz
  • V. L. Naples
  • J. Hearst
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Abstract

 Saber-toothed carnivores, until now, have been divided into two groups: scimitar-toothed cats with shorter, coarsely serrated canines coupled with long legs for fast running, and dirk-toothed cats with more elongate, finely serrated canines coupled to short legs built for power rather than speed. In the Pleistocene of North America, as in Europe, the scimitar-cat was Homotherium; the North American dirk-tooth was Smilodon. We now describe a new sabercat from the Early Pleistocene of Florida, combining the scimitar-tooth canine with the short, massive limbs of a dirk-tooth predator. This presents a third way to construct a saber-toothed carnivore.

Keywords

Europe North America Pleistocene Fast Running Serrate Canine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. D. Martin
    • 1
  • J. P. Babiarz
    • 2
  • V. L. Naples
    • 3
  • J. Hearst
    • 4
  1. 1.Museum of Natural History and Department of Ecology and Systematics, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045, USAUS
  2. 2.Babiarz Institute of Paleontological Studies, 2558 East Lehi Road, Mesa, AZ 85213, USAUS
  3. 3.Department of Biological Sciences, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115-2961, USA e-mail: vlnaples@niu.edu, Tel.: +1-815-7537820, Fax: +1-815-7530461US
  4. 4.Earth Science Department, Emporia State University, Emporia, Kansas 6801, USA e-mail: Jonenahearst@hotmail.comUS

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