Naturwissenschaften

, Volume 97, Issue 8, pp 769–774

Complementary effect of natural and sexual selection against immigrants maintains differentiation between locally adapted fish

  • Martin Plath
  • Rüdiger Riesch
  • Alexandra Oranth
  • Justina Dzienko
  • Nora Karau
  • Angela Schießl
  • Stefan Stadler
  • Adriana Wigh
  • Claudia Zimmer
  • Lenin Arias-Rodriguez
  • Ingo Schlupp
  • Michael Tobler
Short Communication

DOI: 10.1007/s00114-010-0691-x

Cite this article as:
Plath, M., Riesch, R., Oranth, A. et al. Naturwissenschaften (2010) 97: 769. doi:10.1007/s00114-010-0691-x

Abstract

Adaptation to ecologically heterogeneous environments can drive speciation. But what mechanisms maintain reproductive isolation among locally adapted populations? Using poeciliid fishes in a system with naturally occurring toxic hydrogen sulfide, we show that (a) fish from non-sulfidic sites (Poecilia mexicana) show high mortality (95 %) after 24 h when exposed to the toxicant, while locally adapted fish from sulfidic sites (Poecilia sulphuraria) experience low mortality (13 %) when transferred to non-sulfidic water. (b) Mate choice tests revealed that P. mexicana females exhibit a preference for conspecific males in non-sulfidic water, but not in sulfidic water, whereas P. sulphuraria females never showed a preference. Increased costs of mate choice in sulfidic, hypoxic water, and the lack of selection for reinforcement due to the low survival of P. mexicana may explain the absence of a preference in P. sulphuraria females. Taken together, our study may be the first to demonstrate independent—but complementary—effects of natural and sexual selection against immigrants maintaining differentiation between locally adapted fish populations.

Keywords

Ecological speciation Female choice Hydrogen sulfide Isolation-by-adaptation Reciprocal translocation experiment Reproductive isolation 

Supplementary material

114_2010_691_MOESM1_ESM.doc (1.9 mb)
ESM 1(DOC 1.89 MB)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Plath
    • 1
  • Rüdiger Riesch
    • 2
  • Alexandra Oranth
    • 1
  • Justina Dzienko
    • 1
  • Nora Karau
    • 1
  • Angela Schießl
    • 1
  • Stefan Stadler
    • 1
  • Adriana Wigh
    • 1
  • Claudia Zimmer
    • 1
  • Lenin Arias-Rodriguez
    • 3
  • Ingo Schlupp
    • 2
  • Michael Tobler
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Ecology and EvolutionJ.W. Goethe University of FrankfurtFrankfurt am MainGermany
  2. 2.Department of ZoologyUniversity of OklahomaNormanUSA
  3. 3.División Académica de Ciencias BiológicasUniversidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco (UJAT)VillahermosaMéxico
  4. 4.Department of Biology and Department of Wildlife and Fisheries SciencesTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA

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