Chemoecology

, Volume 23, Issue 3, pp 137–142 | Cite as

Fragrant legs in Paysandisia archon males (Lepidoptera, Castniidae)

  • Brigitte Frérot
  • Roxane Delle-Vedove
  • Laurence Beaudoin-Ollivier
  • Pierre Zagatti
  • Paul Henri Ducrot
  • Claude Grison
  • Martine Hossaert
  • Eddy Petit
Research Paper

Abstract

Paysandisia archon was accidentally introduced into Europe where it damages endemic and ornamental palms, also threatening the date palm from North Africa. Little was known about sex pheromones in the Castniidae day-flying moth before a recent paper that concluded on the absence of female sex pheromone in P. archon. A putative identification of a short-range male pheromone, present on fore- and hindwings, was reported. In this paper, we describe the original structure of the male androconia located on the tarsi of the mid-legs. The extracts of mid-legs were analysed by GC/MS and the chemical structure of the male androconia component was identified as E2,Z13-18:OH. After extraction in solvent, biological activity of the extracts was assessed by EAG. The chemistry and the morphology of the androconia reinforce the current classification of the Castniidae in the Cossoid/Sesioid assemblage and provide new information on the chemical ecology in day-flying Lepidoptera and suit the recent paper describing the courtship behaviour

Keywords

Androconia GC–MS NMR E2,Z13-18:OH Lepidoptera Pheromone Chemotaxonomy 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The project was funded by the “Région Languedoc-Roussillon and CIRAD” grant. We would like to thank the arborist, city of Montpellier, for providing infested palms.

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Copyright information

© Springer Basel 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brigitte Frérot
    • 1
  • Roxane Delle-Vedove
    • 3
  • Laurence Beaudoin-Ollivier
    • 3
  • Pierre Zagatti
    • 1
  • Paul Henri Ducrot
    • 4
  • Claude Grison
    • 2
  • Martine Hossaert
    • 2
  • Eddy Petit
    • 2
  1. 1.INRA, UMR PISC 1272VersaillesFrance
  2. 2.CNRS/CEFEMontpellier Cedex 5France
  3. 3.CIRAD, UPR BioagresseursMontpellier Cedex 5France
  4. 4.INRA, IJPBVersaillesFrance

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