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Pharmacological profile of green tea and its polyphenols: a review

Abstract

Tea (Camellia sinensis, Theaceae) is the second most consumed beverages in the world, next to water in terms of worldwide popularity. The chemical components of green tea chiefly include polyphenols, caffeine, and amino acids. Green tea is rich in catechins, of which (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate is the most abundant. As described in literature, green tea and its polyphenols are beneficial in curing a wide variety of diseases like cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, obesity, etc. It also has antimicrobial activity, protects from solar radiations, and possesses neuroprotective properties. The current review article focuses on pharmacological profile associated with Green tea and its polyphenols. We hope that this review will expose areas for further study and encourage research on important public health issue.

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Correspondence to Sumit Bansal.

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Bansal, S., Syan, N., Mathur, P. et al. Pharmacological profile of green tea and its polyphenols: a review. Med Chem Res 21, 3347–3360 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00044-011-9800-4

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Keywords

  • Catechins
  • Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG)
  • Green Tea
  • Polyphenols