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Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of extracts from Gliocladium sp. growing wild in Tunisia

Abstract

The chemical composition of chloroformic, ethyl acetate, butanolic, and methanolic extracts isolated from the fungus Gliocladium sp. using different solvents of increasing polarity was analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. Furthermore, the antimicrobial activity of extracts was tested against five Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and four pathogenic fungi. The tested extracts exhibited an interesting antibacterial activity against all bacteria tested, even against Gram-negative bacteria presenting frequently a higher resistance and against all fungi except Candida albicans.

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Acknowledgments

The authors are grateful to Pr. Biard Jean-François, Laboratory SMAB, Faculty of Pharmacy, Nantes, France, for assistance in the botanical identification and Pr. Amina Bakhrouf, Laboratory of Environment Microbiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Monastir, Tunisia, for assistance in antibacterial assays.

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Correspondence to Zine Mighri.

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Liouane, K., Saïdana, D., Edziri, H. et al. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of extracts from Gliocladium sp. growing wild in Tunisia. Med Chem Res 19, 743–756 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00044-009-9227-3

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Keywords

  • Gliocladium sp.
  • Chemical composition
  • GC-FID
  • GC-MS
  • Antimicrobial activity