Insectes Sociaux

, Volume 63, Issue 2, pp 237–242 | Cite as

Banning paraphylies and executing Linnaean taxonomy is discordant and reduces the evolutionary and semantic information content of biological nomenclature

  • B. Seifert
  • A. Buschinger
  • A. Aldawood
  • V. Antonova
  • H. Bharti
  • L. Borowiec
  • W. Dekoninck
  • D. Dubovikoff
  • X. Espadaler
  • J. Flegr
  • C. Georgiadis
  • J. Heinze
  • R. Neumeyer
  • F. Ødegaard
  • J. Oettler
  • A. Radchenko
  • R. Schultz
  • M. Sharaf
  • J. Trager
  • A. Vesnić
  • M. Wiezik
  • H. Zettel
Commentary

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Copyright information

© International Union for the Study of Social Insects (IUSSI) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Seifert
    • 1
  • A. Buschinger
    • 2
  • A. Aldawood
    • 3
  • V. Antonova
    • 14
  • H. Bharti
    • 4
  • L. Borowiec
    • 5
  • W. Dekoninck
    • 6
  • D. Dubovikoff
    • 7
  • X. Espadaler
    • 18
  • J. Flegr
    • 15
  • C. Georgiadis
    • 8
  • J. Heinze
    • 9
  • R. Neumeyer
    • 10
  • F. Ødegaard
    • 16
  • J. Oettler
    • 9
  • A. Radchenko
    • 19
  • R. Schultz
    • 1
  • M. Sharaf
    • 3
  • J. Trager
    • 11
  • A. Vesnić
    • 12
  • M. Wiezik
    • 13
  • H. Zettel
    • 17
  1. 1.Senckenberg Museum of Natural History GörlitzGörlitzGermany
  2. 2.ReinheimRossbergringGermany
  3. 3.College of Food and Agriculture SciencesKing Saud UniversityRiyadhSaudi Arabia
  4. 4.Department of Zoology and Environmental SciencesPunjabi UniversityPatialaIndia
  5. 5.Department of Biodiversity and Evolutionary TaxonomyUniversity of WroclawWrocławPoland
  6. 6.Royal Belgian Institute for Natural SciencesBrusselsBelgium
  7. 7.Faculty of BiologySt. Petersburg State UniversitySt. PetersburgRussia
  8. 8.Department of BiologyUniversity of AthensAthensGreece
  9. 9.Department of Zoology and Evolutionary BiologyUniversity of RegensburgRegensburgGermany
  10. 10.Probsteistrasse 89ZurichSwitzerland
  11. 11.Shaw Nature Reserve of the Missouri Botanical GardenGray SummitMOUSA
  12. 12.Laboratory for Evolution and EntomologyUniversity of SarajevoSarajevoBosnia and Herzegovina
  13. 13.Department of Applied EcologyTechnical University in ZvolenZvolenSlovakia
  14. 14.Institute of Biodiversity and Ecosystem ResearchBulgarian Academy of SciencesSofiaBulgaria
  15. 15.Faculty of ScienceCharles UniversityPragueCzech Republic
  16. 16.Norwegian Institute for Nature ResearchTrondheimNorway
  17. 17.Museum of Natural History ViennaViennaAustria
  18. 18.Autonomous University of BarcelonaBellaterraSpain
  19. 19.Schmalhausen Institute of ZoologyKievUkraine

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