The dance legacy of Karl von Frisch

Abstract

Karl von Frisch published “Die Tänze der Bienen” in 1946, which demonstrated that successful honey bee foragers perform a stereotyped dance to communicate the location of valuable resources to her nestmates. This discovery proved to be the starting point of many areas of investigation. Here I review some recent advancement in our understanding of the waggle dance.

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Acknowledgments

I would like to thank Fiona Riddell Pearce, Christoph Grüter, Felipe Andrés León Contrera, and James Nieh for their helpful comments on this manuscript. I also thank two anonymous reviewers for their useful comments and suggestions. MJC is funded by The Nineveh Charitable Trust.

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Couvillon, M.J. The dance legacy of Karl von Frisch. Insect. Soc. 59, 297–306 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00040-012-0224-z

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Keywords

  • Waggle dance
  • Honey bee foraging
  • Recruitment
  • Karl von Frisch
  • Apis mellifera