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International Journal of Public Health

, Volume 59, Issue 6, pp 1011–1021 | Cite as

Status of the diabetes epidemic in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, 2013

  • Charbel El Bcheraoui
  • Mohammed Basulaiman
  • Marwa Tuffaha
  • Farah Daoud
  • Margaret Robinson
  • Sara Jaber
  • Sarah Mikhitarian
  • Ziad A. Memish
  • Mohammad Al Saeedi
  • Mohammad A. AlMazroa
  • Ali H. MokdadEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

Objectives

In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), current data on diabetes are lacking, and a rise of the epidemic is feared, given the epidemiologic transition in the country. To inform public health authorities on the current status of the diabetes epidemic, we analyzed data from the Saudi Health Interview Survey (SHIS).

Methods

Saudi Health Interview Survey is a cross-sectional national multistage survey of individuals aged 15 years or older. A total of 10,735 participants completed a health questionnaire and were invited to the local health clinics for biomedical exams.

Results

1,745,532 (13.4 %) Saudis aged 15 years or older have diabetes. Among those, 57.8, 20.2, 16.6, and 5.4 % are undiagnosed, treated uncontrolled, treated controlled, and untreated, respectively. Males, older individuals, and those who were previously diagnosed with hypertension or hypercholesterolemia were more likely to be diabetic.

Conclusions

Our findings call for increased awareness of pre-diabetes, diabetes, and undiagnosed diabetes in KSA. Combatting diabetes and other non-communicable diseases should be the task of the Ministry of Health and other ministries as well, to offer a comprehensive socio-cultural approach to fighting this epidemic.

Keywords

Saudi Arabia Diabetes Survey Undiagnosed Screening 

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Copyright information

© Swiss School of Public Health 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charbel El Bcheraoui
    • 1
  • Mohammed Basulaiman
    • 2
  • Marwa Tuffaha
    • 1
  • Farah Daoud
    • 1
  • Margaret Robinson
    • 1
  • Sara Jaber
    • 1
  • Sarah Mikhitarian
    • 1
  • Ziad A. Memish
    • 2
  • Mohammad Al Saeedi
    • 2
  • Mohammad A. AlMazroa
    • 2
  • Ali H. Mokdad
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Institute for Health Metrics and EvaluationUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  2. 2.Ministry of Health of the Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaAl Murabba RiyadhSaudi Arabia

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