International Journal of Public Health

, Volume 56, Issue 1, pp 107–110 | Cite as

Education and depressive symptoms in 22 European countries

  • Olaf von dem Knesebeck
  • Elise Pattyn
  • Piet Bracke
Brief Report

Abstract

Objectives

Variations in the association between education and depressive symptoms in 22 European countries are investigated.

Methods

Analyses are based on the European Social Survey Round 3 (N = 34,443). Education was coded according to the International Standard Classification of Education. Depressive symptoms are measured by the shortened Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D 8).

Results

The results of multiple logistic regressions show that people with low education have elevated risks of experiencing a high score of depressive symptoms. Relatively large inequalities were observed among both sexes for Hungary and Slovenia, small and non-significant inequalities for Austria, Denmark, and Estonia.

Conclusion

The results indicate that educational inequalities in depressive symptoms are a generalized although not invariant phenomenon.

Keywords

Educational inequalities Depressive symptoms Europe International differences 

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Copyright information

© Swiss School of Public Health 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Olaf von dem Knesebeck
    • 1
  • Elise Pattyn
    • 2
  • Piet Bracke
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Medical SociologyUniversity Medical Center Hamburg-EppendorfHamburgGermany
  2. 2.Department of SociologyGhent UniversityGhentBelgium

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