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Inflammation Research

, Volume 47, Issue 12, pp 476–481 | Cite as

Antiinflammatory potency of dehydrocurdione, a zedoary-derived sesquiterpene

  • T. Yoshioka
  • E. Fujii
  • M. Endo
  • K. Wada
  • Y. Tokunaga
  • N. Shiba
  • H. Hohsho
  • H. Shibuya
  • T. Muraki

Abstract.

Objective and Design: Dehydrocurdione, a sesquiterpene isolated from zedoary, was tested for in vivo and in vitro antiinflammatory actions.¶Materials: Analgesic effect was tested in ICR mice by the acetic acid-induced writhing method. Antipyretic effect was studied in Sprague-Dawley rats treated with baker's yeast. Antiinflammatory activities were tested in Wistar rats with carrageenan-induced paw edema and adjuvant-induced chronic arthritis. In vitro analyses included the capabilities to inhibit cyclooxygenase activity, and to scavenge free radicals as determined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).¶Results: Oral administration of dehydrocurdione (40 to 200 mg/kg) mitigated the writhing reflex induced by acetic acid and the fever elicited by baker's yeast. A higher dose (200 mg/kg) of dehydrocurdione was required to inhibit the carrageenan-induced paw edema. Oral administration of dehydrocurdione at 120 mg/kg/day for 12 days significantly reduced chronic adjuvant arthritis. Unlike indomethacin (IC50: 0.1 μM), dehydrocurdione showed minimal cyclooxygenase inhibition. However, dehydrocurdione (100 μM to 5 mM) significantly reduced free radical formation from hydrogen peroxide and ferrous iron determined by EPR spectrometry using 5,5′-dimethyl-l-pyrroline-N-oxide as a spin trap agent.¶Conclusion: In addition to the well-known effect of zedoary as a stomachic, dehydrocurdione, the major component of Curcuma zedoaria Roscoe has antiinflammatory potency related to its antioxidant effect.

Key words: Dehydrocurdione — Zedoary — Antiinflammatory drug — Antioxidant — Electron paramagnetic resonance 

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag, Basel, 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Yoshioka
    • 1
  • E. Fujii
    • 1
  • M. Endo
    • 1
  • K. Wada
    • 1
  • Y. Tokunaga
    • 2
  • N. Shiba
    • 3
  • H. Hohsho
    • 3
  • H. Shibuya
    • 4
  • T. Muraki
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, School of Medicine, Kawada-cho, 8-1 Kawada-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8666, Japan, Fax +81 3 5269-7417, e-mail: yoshioka@research.twmc.ac.jpJP
  2. 2.Department of Pharmacology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582, JapanJP
  3. 3.Keimeido Co. Ltd., Shinkawa, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0033, JapanJP
  4. 4.Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuyama University, Sanzo, Gakuen-cho, Fukuyama, Hiroshima 729-0292, JapanJP

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