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Killing time in the outdoors

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Abstract

This paper explores the time-related experiences of outdoor educators. The research specifically focuses on the subjective experience of time during the short-term (three to five days) secondary school outdoor education programmes of four outdoor educators. Interviews with these four participants provide insight into what time actually feels like in the field and, just as importantly, how it is negotiated. Unsurprisingly, the experiences shared expose the often hurried and frenzied nature of many short-term outdoor experiences. The findings of this study offer an opportunity to understand more deeply the exact nature of this marked sense of time pressure. Through the discussion of four main themes, readers are invited to reflect upon their own experience of time, its impact on educational practice, and what slowing down might just have to offer.

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Correspondence to Amanda Fittler.

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Amanda Fittler recently graduated from Western Sydney University with a Master of Education in Social Ecology. She is interested in finding ways to incorporate social ecological understanding into the design and delivery of outdoor and environmental education programmes.

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Fittler, A. Killing time in the outdoors. Journal of Outdoor and Environmental Education 20, 24–31 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03401011

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