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The Psychological Record

, Volume 40, Issue 2, pp 289–311 | Cite as

Observational Learning in Fish, Birds, and Mammals: A Classified Bibliography Spanning Over 100 Years of Research

  • Michèle Robert
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Bony Fish Cypriniformes Cyprinidae: goldfishes

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Galliformes Phasianidae: chickens, hens, moorhens, and quails

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Charadriiformes Haematopodidae: oyster catchers

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Passeriformes Tyrannidae: fly-catchers

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Corvidae: jackdaws and jays

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Turdidae: thrushes

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Paridae: chickadees and tits

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Sturnidae: starlings

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Icteridae: blackbirds

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Emberizidae: juncos

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Fringillidae: finches

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Mammals Chiroptera Megadermatidae: false vampire bats

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Vespertilionidae: brown and desert bats

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Lemuridae: lemurs

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Cebidae: capuchins and squirrel monkeys

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Cercopithecidae: baboons, macaques, Patas monkeys, and vervet monkeys

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Rodentia Sciuridae: squirrels

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Cetacea Delphinidae: dolphins

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Carnivora Canidae: dogs

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Procyonidae: raccoons

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Mustelidae: otters

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Felidae: cats and lions

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Perissodactyla Equidae: horses

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Artiodactyla Cervidae: moose

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Bovidae: sheep

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Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michèle Robert
    • 1
  1. 1.Département de psychologieUniversité de MontréalMontréalCanada

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