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The Psychological Record

, Volume 40, Issue 4, pp 587–607 | Cite as

From Reflex to Memory: Molar Sequences in Pavlovian and Instrumental Conditioning

  • François Tonneau
Article

Abstract

The storage/retrieval metaphor of memory has been applied to Pavlovlan and instrumental conditioning. The present article examines the fundamental reasons for doing so and proposes a new behavior-analytic alternative to memory theory. This approach relies heavily on the concept of temporal molarity, applied to the environment. It attributes behavioral control not to punctuated stimuli (CSs or Sds), but to more complex sequences of events. Albeit speculative, such a molar sequential approach (cf. Wilcox & Katz, 1981) permits a better treatment of experimental data than other behavioristic theories and may lead to a greater sophistication in the analysis of behavior change.

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Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • François Tonneau
    • 1
  1. 1.Universite Charles de Gaulle - Lille 3Villeneuve d’Ascq cedexFrance

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