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The Psychological Record

, Volume 32, Issue 1, pp 3–17 | Cite as

Biofeedback: Clinically Valid or Oversold?

  • Lawrence Simkins
Article

Abstract

Despite over 20 years of research, the clinical effectiveness of biofeedback has not been established. Nevertheless the use of biofeedback techniques has been promulgated as a beneficial form of treatment for a wide variety of disorders. Although some biofeedback applications seem to be highly effective, the research underlying many other types of application remains equivocal. This article addresses a number of the more important critical issues, both methodological and conceptual that are in need of resolution before biofeedback can be promoted as a clinically valid treatment procedure on as wide a basis as is presently the case.

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Reference Notes

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Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lawrence Simkins
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Missouri-Kansas CityKansas CityUSA

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