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The Psychological Record

, Volume 61, Issue 2, pp 173–198 | Cite as

A Relational Frame Training Intervention to Raise Intelligence Quotients: A Pilot Study

  • Sarah Cassidy
  • Bryan RocheEmail author
  • Steven C. Hayes
Article

Abstract

The current research consisted of 2 studies designed to test the effectiveness of automated multiple-exemplar relational training in raising children’s general intellectual skills. In Study 1, 4 participants were exposed to multiple exemplar training in stimulus equivalence and the relational frames of SAME, OPPOSITE, MORE THAN, and LESS THAN across several sessions and weeks. WISC (III-UK) measures were taken at baseline, following stimulus equivalence training, and again following relational frame training. Matched against a no-treatment control group, experimental participants showed significant improvements in full-scale IQ following stimulus equivalence training, and a further significant rise following relational frame training. Study 2 administered an improved multiple-exemplar-based relational frame training intervention to 8 children with a range of educational and behavioral difficulties. In 7 of the 8 cases, full-scale IQ as measured by the WISC (IV-UK) rose by at least 1 SD; the improvement was statistically significant at the group level. These data have important implications for the behavioral analysis of intellectual skills and suggest the basis of an intervention to improve general cognitive functioning.

Key words

Relational Frame Theory IQ intelligence relational training multiple exemplar training 

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Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sarah Cassidy
    • 1
  • Bryan Roche
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Steven C. Hayes
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Dept. of PsychologyNational University of IrelandMaynooth, Co. KildareIreland
  2. 2.University of NevadaRenoUSA

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