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Fluency Training a Writing Skill: Editing for Concision

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Abstract

The goal of this study was to design and evaluate fluency-based training units to help students eliminate inconcision. Participants first completed a 1.5-hr lesson on writing concisely and then a 5-min test during which they edited sentences containing inconcise text from the training units. Subsequently, participants were randomly assigned to an intervention package that included fluency training or an intervention package that included control activities. After about 5 weeks, all participants retook the test. In 2 such experiments, relative to their initial rates, fluency-trained participants improved more than did control participants; the improvement for fluency-trained participants was often maintained for 5 weeks. The findings’ limitations are discussed, as well as their implications for enhancing student writing and further research.

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Correspondence to Marshall L. Dermer.

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Dermer, M.L., Lopez, S.L. & Messling, P.A. Fluency Training a Writing Skill: Editing for Concision. Psychol Rec 59, 3–20 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03395646

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