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Events and Constructs

Abstract

Psychology has largely ignored the distinction between constructs and events and what comprises a scientific construct, yet this distinction is basic to some of the major divisions of thought within the discipline. Several kinds of constructs are identified and compared with events, and improper use of constructs is noted of which the mind construct is a prime example. After indicating some problems with a failure to maintain the distinction between constructs and events and to establish constructs based on events, a list of criteria for scientific employment of constructs is proposed as a means of clarifying and advancing work in psychology. An example of a construct-based and of an event-based approach provides a contrast in scientific orientation with the implication that only by using the latter can psychology remedy its fragmentation and make advancements as a science.

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Correspondence to Noel W. Smith.

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Smith, N.W. Events and Constructs. Psychol Rec 57, 169–186 (2007). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03395570

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