Stereotyped Behavior During Spaced Responding: Mediation vs. Superstition

Abstract

Human subjects learned to button press on a differential reinforcement of low rate schedule while seated on an exercise bicycle. Concurrent pedalling behavior developed in 9 out of 10 subjects. When the torque of pedalling was remotely manipulated, subjects tended to increase their rate of responding when torque was decreased, and vice-versa. Therefore, pedalling was interpreted as a strategy used to aid temporal estimates. Results are discussed in terms of their opposition to a superstition interpretation.

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Correspondence to W. H. Tedford Jr..

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This research was supported in part by Grant NSF-GU-3752

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Flynn, W.E., Tedford, W.H. Stereotyped Behavior During Spaced Responding: Mediation vs. Superstition. Psychol Rec 26, 553–556 (1976). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03394423

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