The Analysis of Verbal Behavior

, Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 13–40 | Cite as

Thirty Points About Motivation From Skinner’s Book Verbal Behavior

Special Section on Motivating Operations and Verbal Behavior

Abstract

Skinner discussed the topic of motivation in every chapter of the book Verbal Behavior (1957), usually with his preferred terminology of “deprivation, satiation, and aversive stimulation.” In the current paper, direct quotations are used to systematically take the reader through 30 separate points made by Skinner in Verbal Behavior that collectively provide a comprehensive analysis of his position regarding the role of motivation in behavior analysis. In addition, various refinements and extensions of Skinner’s analysis by Jack Michael and colleagues (Laraway, Snycerski, Michael, & Poling, 2003; Michael, 1982, 1988, 1993, 2000, 2004, 2007) are incorporated, along with suggestions for research and applications for several of the points.

Key words

drive Jack Michael motivating operations Verbal Behavior (1957) 

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Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Sundberg and AssociatesConcordUSA

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