The Analysis of Verbal Behavior

, Volume 28, Issue 1, pp 137–144 | Cite as

Effect of Training Different Classes of Verbal Behavior to Decrease Aberrant Verbal Behavior

  • Monica Vandbakk
  • Erik Arntzen
  • Arnt Gisnaas
  • Vidar Antonsen
  • Terje Gundhus
Article
  • 9 Downloads

Abstract

Inappropriate verbal behavior that is labeled “psychotic” is often described as insensitive to environmental contingencies. The purpose of the current study was to establish different classes of rational or appropriate verbal behavior in a woman with developmental disabilities and evaluate the effects on her psychotic or aberrant vocal verbal behavior. Similar to a previous study (Arntzen, Ro Tonnessen, & Brouwer, 2006, the results of the current study suggested that the procedure helped to establish a repertoire of appropriate functional vocal verbal behavior in the participant. Overall, the results suggested the effectiveness of an intervention based on training various classes of verbal behavior in decreasing aberrant verbal behavior.

Key words

vocal verbal behavior verbal operants psychotic behavior autism 

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References

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Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Monica Vandbakk
    • 1
  • Erik Arntzen
    • 1
  • Arnt Gisnaas
    • 2
  • Vidar Antonsen
    • 2
  • Terje Gundhus
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Behavioral ScienceOslo and Akershus University CollegeOsloNorway
  2. 2.Oslo University HospitalNorway

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