The Analysis of Verbal Behavior

, Volume 28, Issue 1, pp 111–117 | Cite as

The Effects of Listener and Speaker Training on Emergent Relations in Children With Autism

Article

Abstract

The current study assessed the use of standard conditional discrimination (i.e., listener) and textual/tact (i.e., speaker) training in the establishment of equivalence classes containing dictated names, tacts/textual responses, pictures and printed words. Four children (ages 5 to 7 years) diagnosed with autism were taught to select pictures and printed words in the presence of their dictated names, and to emit the tact or textual response corresponding to a presented picture or printed word. Both speaker and listener training resulted in the formation of stimulus classes for 3 of 4 participants.

Key words

stimulus equivalence naming speaker listener autism 

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Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyCalifornia State University, SacramentoSacramentoUSA

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