The Analysis of Verbal Behavior

, Volume 28, Issue 1, pp 59–71 | Cite as

The Effect of Joint Control Training on the Acquisition and Durability of a Sequencing Task

Article

Abstract

Gutierrez (2006) experimentally demonstrated the effects of joint control and particularly the role of response mediation in the sequencing behavior of adults using an unfamiliar language. The purpose of the current study was to replicate and extend the procedures used by Gutierrez by comparing the effects of joint control training with the effects of a prompt-and-fade procedure on the acquisition of a sequencing task. The effects of each procedure on delayed sequencing behavior were also tested. Ten undergraduate students participated in 2 experiments. The results indicated that all participants acquired the sequencing response in fewer trials and maintained accurate delayed responding when the component responses necessary for joint control were directly taught. Finally, when the self-echoic mediation component was blocked, accurate responding deteriorated in 8 of 10 participants.

Key words

joint control echoic tact verbal behavior 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Gutierrez, R. (2006). The role of rehearsal in joint control. Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 22, 183–190.PubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  2. Lowenkron, B. (1984). Coding responses and the generalization of matching to sample in children. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 42(1), 1–18.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  3. Lowenkron, B. (1988). Generalization of delayed identity matching in retarded children. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 50(2), 163–172.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  4. Lowenkron, B. (1989). Instructional control of generalized relational matching to sample in children. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 52(3), 293–309.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  5. Lowenkron, B. (1998). Some logical functions of joint control. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 69(3), 327–354.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  6. Lowenkron, B. (2006a). An introduction to joint control. Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 22, 123–127.PubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  7. Lowenkron, B. (2006b). Joint control and the selection of stimuli from their description. Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 22, 129–151.PubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  8. Sidener, D. (2006). Joint control for dummies: An elaboration of Lowenkron’s model of joint (stimulus) control. Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 22, 119–122.PubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  9. Sidener, D., & Michael, J. (2006). Generalization of relational matching to sample in children: A direct replication. Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 22, 171–181.PubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  10. Skinner, B. F. (1957). Verbal behavior. New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Tu, J. (2006). The role of joint control in the manded selection responses of both vocal and non-vocal children with autism. Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 22, 191–207.PubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyCalifornia State UniversityDr. Los AngelesUSA
  2. 2.California Unified Service Providers, L.L.CUSA

Personalised recommendations