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The Analysis of Verbal Behavior

, Volume 24, Issue 1, pp 147–158 | Cite as

A Behavioral Conceptualization of Aphasia

  • Jonathan C. Baker
  • Linda A. LeBlanc
  • Paige B. Raetz
Article

Abstract

Aphasia is an acquired language impairment that affects over 1 million individuals, the majority of whom are over age 65 (Groher, 1989). This disorder has typically been conceptualized within a cognitive neuroscience framework, but a behavioral interpretation of aphasia is also possible. Skinner’s (1957) analysis of verbal behavior proposes a framework of verbal operants that can be integrated with the work of Sidman (1971) and Haughton (1980) to describe the language difficulties individuals with aphasia experience. Using this synthesis of models, we propose a new taxonomy of aphasia based on the observed deficit relations. Assessment and treatment implications are also discussed.

Keywords

aphasia language verbal behavior equivalence learning channels 

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Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan C. Baker
    • 1
  • Linda A. LeBlanc
    • 1
  • Paige B. Raetz
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyWestern Michigan UniversityKalamazooUSA

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