The Analysis of Verbal Behavior

, Volume 24, Issue 1, pp 135–146 | Cite as

Using Stimulus-Stimulus Pairing and Direct Reinforcement to Teach Vocal Verbal Behavior to Young Children With Autism

Article

Abstract

In this study the effect of a stimulus-stimulus pairing procedure was used as part of a clinical investigation to increase vocalizations for two young children diagnosed with autism. This procedure involved pairing a vocal sound with a preferred stimulus (e.g., toy) to condition automatic reinforcement. In addition, this study assessed the effects of a direct reinforcement procedure to bring a vocalization under echoic control following the pairing procedure for 1 of the participants. The results showed the pairing procedure was used successfully to increase a vocalization for one of the participants, and the vocalization was brought under echoic control.

Keywords

autism stimulus-stimulus pairing automatic reinforcement 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bailey, S. J., & Burch, R. M. (2002). Research Methods in Applied Behavior Analysis. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Esch, B. E., Carr, J. E., & Michael, J. (2005). Evaluating stimulus-stimulus pairing and direct reinforcement in the establishment of an echoic repertoire of children diagnosed with autism. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 21, 43–58.PubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  3. Higbee, T. S., Carr, J. E., & Harrison, C. D. (2000). Further evaluation of the multiple-stimulus preference assessment. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 21, 61–73.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Miguel, C. F., Carr, J. E., & Michael, J. (2002). The effects of a stimulus-stimulus pairing procedure on the vocal behavior of children diagnosed with autism. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 18, 3–13.PubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  5. Normand, M. P., & Knoll, M. L. (2006). The effects of a stimulus-stimulus pairing procedure on the unprompted vocalizations of a young child diagnosed with autism. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 22, 81–85.PubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  6. Skinner B. F., (1957). Verbal Behavior. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Smith, R., Michael, J., & Sundberg, M. L. (1996). Automatic reinforcement and automatic punishment in infant vocal behavior. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 13, 39–48.PubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  8. Sundberg, C. A., Michael, J., Partington, J. W., & Sundberg, M. L. (1996). The role of automatic reinforcement in early language acquisition. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 13, 21–37.PubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  9. Sundberg, M. L., & Partington, J.W. (1998). Teaching language to children with autism or other developmental disabilities. Pleasant Hill, CA: Behavior Analysts, Inc.Google Scholar
  10. Vaughan, M. E., & Michael, J. (1982). Automatic reinforcement: An important but ignored concept. Behaviorism, 10, 217–227.Google Scholar
  11. Yoon, S., & Bennett, G. M. (2000). Effects of a stimulus-stimulus pairing procedure on conditioning vocal sounds as reinforcers. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior 17, 75–88.PubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Psychology DepartmentUniversity of Wisconsin, Eau ClaireEau ClaireUSA

Personalised recommendations