The Analysis of Verbal Behavior

, Volume 24, Issue 1, pp 123–133 | Cite as

A Comparison of Stimulus-Stimulus Pairing, Standard Echoic Training, and Control Procedures on the Vocal Behavior of Children With Autism

  • Richard A. Stock
  • Kimberly A. Schulze
  • Pat Mirenda
Article

Abstract

An alternating treatments design was employed to compare the effect of stimulus-stimulus pairing, standard echoic training, and a control condition on the vocal behavior of 3 preschoolers with autism. Data were recorded during pre- and postsession observations. During the stimulus-stimulus pairing condition, the experimenter’s vocal model was paired with the delivery of a preferred item. During the standard echoic training condition, the experimenter presented a vocal model and delivered a preferred item contingent on an echoic response. During the control condition, the experimenter presented a vocal model and, after a 10-s delay, presented a preferred edible item. Results from the post-session observations during the stimulusstimulus pairing condition showed an immediate but temporary increase in the target sound for 1 participant only. Implications and suggestions for future research are provided.

Keywords

autism automatic reinforcement stimulus-stimulus pairing echoic training verbal behavior 

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Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard A. Stock
    • 1
  • Kimberly A. Schulze
    • 2
  • Pat Mirenda
    • 3
  1. 1.University of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  2. 2.St. Cloud State UniversityUSA
  3. 3.University of British ColumbiaUSA

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