The Analysis of Verbal Behavior

, Volume 23, Issue 1, pp 89–102 | Cite as

Transferring Control of the Mand to the Motivating Operation in Children with Autism

  • Emily J. Sweeney-Kerwin
  • Vincent J. Carbone
  • Leigh O’Brien
  • Gina Zecchin
  • Marietta N. Janecky
Article

Abstract

Few studies have made use of B. F. Skinner’s (1957) behavioral analysis of language and precise taxonomy of verbal behavior when describing the controlling variables for the mand relation. Consequently, the motivating operation (MO) has not typically been identified as an independent variable and the nature of a spontaneous mand has been imprecisely described. The purpose of this study was to develop procedures to bring the mand response under the control of the relevant MO and therefore free it from the multiple controls that are more easily identified by practitioner’s who rely on Skinner’s analysis and taxonomy. Using a rolling time delay and prompt fade procedure both participants’ mand repertoires were successfully transferred to the relevant MO and a listener and described within the context of a behavioral analysis of language.

Key words

verbal behavior motivating operation mand autism 

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Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emily J. Sweeney-Kerwin
    • 1
  • Vincent J. Carbone
    • 1
  • Leigh O’Brien
    • 1
  • Gina Zecchin
    • 1
  • Marietta N. Janecky
    • 1
  1. 1.Carbone ClinicValley CottageUSA

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