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The Analysis of Verbal Behavior

, Volume 22, Issue 1, pp 209–215 | Cite as

Joint Control: A Discussion of Recent Research

Article

Abstract

The discrimination of the onset of joint control is an important interpretive tool in explaining matching behavior and other complex phenomena, but the difficulty of getting experimental control of all relevant variables stands in the way of a definitive experiment. The studies in the present issue of The Analysis of Verbal Behavior illustrate how modest experiments can take their place in a web of interpretation to make a strong case that joint control is a necessary element of such phenomena.

Key words

joint control verbal behavior 

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Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologySmith College NorthamptonUSA

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