The Analysis of Verbal Behavior

, Volume 22, Issue 1, pp 191–207 | Cite as

The Role of Joint Control in the Manded Selection Responses of Both Vocal and Non-vocal Children with Autism

Article

Abstract

In the present study, joint-control training was applied when teaching manded selection responses to children with autism. Four vocal children with autism participated in the first experiment, two males (ages seven and eight) and two females (ages seven and nine). The results showed that it was only after object-word naming was trained under joint control that the symmetrical performance of manded selection responses appeared with no additional training. Four non-vocal children with autism participated in the second experiment, two males (ages six and seven), and two females (ages twelve and thirteen). These results also showed that it was only after the joint tact/self-mimetic/sequelic control training that the symmetrical performance of manded selection responses appeared with no additional training.

Key words

joint control listener’s behavior manded selection responses match-to-sample autism 

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Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Center for Behavioral Sciences, Inc.Costa MesaUSA

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