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The Analysis of Verbal Behavior

, Volume 22, Issue 1, pp 123–127 | Cite as

An Introduction to Joint Control

  • Barry Lowenkron
Article

Abstract

Lowenkron and colleagues (Lowenkron, 1984; 1991; 1998; 2006; Lowenkron and Colvin, 1992) describe a model that explains complex behavior using only well-established behavioral principles, concepts and terms. The model, called joint control, is especially useful for understanding complex and delayed discriminations within a purely behavioral framework and with no appeal to hypothetical concepts or structures. In it the listener is an active behaver rather than a processor of information. In fact, on this account the listener becomes a speaker. Several examples of the relevance of this approach to the explanation of complex behavior are provided, including cases of stimulus selection, conditional discrimination, and generalized identity matching.

Key words

joint control selection-based autoclitic self-echoic/tact relation semantic function word-object bidirectionality 

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Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barry Lowenkron
    • 1
  1. 1.California State UniversityLos AngelesUSA

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