The Analysis of Verbal Behavior

, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 175–179 | Cite as

Autistic Behavior, Behavior Analysis, and the Gene—Part II

Article

Abstract

This article reviews the negative behavior-analytic commentary on Drash and Tudor’s behavior-analytic analysis of the etiology of autistic repertoires and values. This article also asks that, in our effort to scrub it clean, we not drown Drash and Tudor’s beautiful, but fragile, new-born, behavior-analytic baby in hypermethodological, hyper-scholarly bathwater.

Key words

autism behavior analysis gene etiology of autism medical model contingency verbal behavior 

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References

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Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyWestern Michigan UniversityKalamazooUSA

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