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The Analysis of Verbal Behavior

, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 145–153 | Cite as

Reducing Palilalia by Presenting Tact Corrections to Young Children with Autism

  • Irfa Karmali
  • R. Douglas Greer
  • Robin Nuzzolo-Gomez
  • Denise E. Ross
  • Celestina Rivera-Valdes
Article

Abstract

Palilalia, the delayed repetition of words or phrases, occurs frequently among individuals with autism and developmental disabilities. The current study used a combined multiple baseline and reversal design to investigate the effectiveness of presenting tacts as corrections for palilalia. During baseline, five preschoolers with autism emitted high rates of palilalia and low rates of mands and tacts during play and instructional activities. During treatment, when experimenters presented opportunities to echoically tact actions and objects following the emission of palilalia, its frequency decreased to low and stable levels and mands and tacts increased. Functional relationships between the tact corrections and emissions of palilalia, mands, and tacts were established during reversals to baseline and treatment conditions. Similar trends in responding were found for frequency of palilalia, mands, and tacts in non-treatment settings.

Key words

palilalia delayed-echolalia tact operant autism 

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Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Irfa Karmali
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. Douglas Greer
    • 1
    • 2
  • Robin Nuzzolo-Gomez
    • 1
    • 2
  • Denise E. Ross
    • 1
    • 2
  • Celestina Rivera-Valdes
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Teachers CollegeColumbia UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Graduate School of Arts and SciencesColumbia UniversityUSA

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