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The Analysis of Verbal Behavior

, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 13–25 | Cite as

Expanding Vocal Requesting Repertoires via Relational Responding in Adults with Severe Developmental Disabilities

  • Christine Halvey
  • Ruth Anne Rehfeldt
Article

Abstract

The purpose of this project was to demonstrate untrained vocal requests in three adults with severe developmental disabilities. Specifically, we evaluated whether a history of reinforced relational responding would give rise to untrained vocal requests for novel items. Participants were first taught to request preferred items using their category names. They were then taught conditional discriminations between pictures of preferred items that were categorically related. Finally, participants were tested for their abilities to request items that had not been originally presented during request training, using their category names. All participants demonstrated untrained requests, and for some participants, changes in the mand repertoire were accompanied by changes in the tact repertoire. Some participants also showed generalization of skills across settings.

Key Words

request derived stimulus relations relational learning verbal behavior mand tact mental retardation 

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Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Rehabilitation Institute, Rehabilitation Services ProgramSouthern Illinois UniversityCarbondaleUSA

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