The Analysis of Verbal Behavior

, Volume 15, Issue 1, pp 125–127 | Cite as

The Methodological Challenge of the Functional Analysis of Verbal Behavior

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Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyGonzaga UniversitySpokaneUSA

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