The Analysis of Verbal Behavior

, Volume 15, Issue 1, pp 107–112 | Cite as

Interpreting Verbal Behavior

  • John W. Donahoe
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Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • John W. Donahoe
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychology, Tobin HallUniversity of Massachusetts at AmherstAmherstUSA

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