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The Analysis of Verbal Behavior

, Volume 8, Issue 1, pp 113–126 | Cite as

Establishing verbal repertoires: Toward the application of general case analysis and programming

  • Robert E. O’Neill
Article

Abstract

A great deal of clinical and experimental work in past decades has focused on establishing functional verbal repertoires that are used across various settings and situations by persons with moderate and severe disabilities. Such work has not always involved a careful analysis and programming approach for structuring training to achieve the desired range of stimulus control relationships. General case analysis and programming procedures, which are based on behavior analytic and Direct Instruction principles and techniques, have proven effective in recent years for teaching a variety of community-based skills to learners with moderate and severe disabilities. This paper outlines the general case process and discusses its application to establish verbal repertoires.

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Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert E. O’Neill
    • 1
  1. 1.Specialized Training Program, College of EducationUniversity of OregonEugeneUSA

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