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The Analysis of Verbal Behavior

, Volume 8, Issue 1, pp 83–99 | Cite as

The acquisition of tacts, mands, and intraverbals by individuals with traumatic brain injury

  • Mark L. Sundberg
  • Belinda San Juan
  • Marjorie Dawdy
  • Marilla Argüelles
Article

Abstract

Two individuals who sustained traumatic brain injuries from motorcycle accidents were taught several verbal responses by using tact, mand, and intraverbal training procedures. The rate of acquisition for each operant and the transfer to untrained verbal operants involving the same response topography were measured. The results showed that tacts and intraverbals were acquired quickest, and training on the tact produced the greatest amount of transfer to the untrained verbal operants. Intraverbal training also resulted in transfer for both subjects, but to varying degrees. Direct mand training proved to be the least efficient way to generate a mand repertoire, and when acquired showed least amount of transfer to the untrained operants. These results seem to be in contrast with the findings of similar research with developmentally disabled individuals, and may have implications for methods of language instruction for the brain injured population.

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Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark L. Sundberg
    • 1
  • Belinda San Juan
    • 2
  • Marjorie Dawdy
    • 2
  • Marilla Argüelles
    • 2
  1. 1.Sundberg and AssociatesConcordUSA
  2. 2.Consensus Brain Injury Rehabilitation CenterBerkeleyUSA

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