The Analysis of Verbal Behavior

, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp 53–68 | Cite as

A review of empirical studies of verbal behavior

  • She-zeen Oah
  • Alyce M. Dickinson
Article

Abstract

This paper reviews empirical research which has been directly influenced by Skinner’s Verbal Behavior. Despite the importance of this subject matter, the book has generated relatively little empirical research. Most studies have focused on Skinner’s mand and tact relations while research focused on the other elementary verbal operants has been limited. However, the results of empirical research that exist support Skinner’s analysis of the distinction between elementary verbal operants and his distinction between the speaker’s and listener’s repertoires. Further, research suggests that language training programs may not be successful if they do not provide explicit training of each elementary verbal operant and independent training of speaker’s and listener’s repertoires.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Boe, R., & Winokur, S. (1978a). A procedure for studying echoic control in verbal behavior. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 30, 213–217.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  2. Boe, R., & Winokur, S. (1978b). Echoic control in conversational speech. Journal of General Psychology, 99, 299–304.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Braam, S. J., & Poling, A. (1983). Development of intraverbal behavior in mentally retarded individuals through transfer of stimulus control procedures: Classification of verbal responses. Applied Research in Mental Retardation, 4, 279–302.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Carroll, R. J., & Hesse, B. E. (1987). The effects of alternating mand and tact training on the acquisition of tacts. The Analysis of Verbal behavior, 5, 55–65.PubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  5. Chase, P., Johnson, K., & Sulzer-Azaroff, B. (1985). Verbal relations within instruction: Are there subclasses of the intraverbal? Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 43, 301–314.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  6. Chomsky, N. (1959). Review of B. F. Skinner’s Verbal behavior. Language, 35, 26–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Epstein, R., Lanza, R., & Skinner, B. F. (1980). Symbolic communication between two pigeons (Columba livia domestica). Science, 207, 543–545.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Guess, D. (1969). A functional analysis of receptive language and productive speech: Acquisition of the plural morpheme. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 2, 55–64.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  9. Guess, D., & Baer, D. M. (1973). An analysis of individual differences in generalization between receptive and productive language in retarded children. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 6, 311–329.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  10. Guess, D., Sailor, W., Rutherford, G., & Baer, D. M. (1968). An experimental analysis of linguistic development: The productive use of the plural morpheme. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 1, 297–306.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  11. Hall, G., & Sundberg, M. L. (1987). Teaching mands by manipulating conditioned establishing operations. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 5, 41–53.PubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  12. Howard, J. S., & Rice, D. E. (1988). Establishing a generalized autoclitic repertoire in preschool children. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 6, 45–59.PubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  13. Hung, D. (1980). Training and generalization of “yes” and “no” as mands in two autistic children. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 10, 139–152.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. Keller, F. S., & Schoenfeld, W. N. (1950). Principles of psychology. New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts.Google Scholar
  15. Lamarre, J., & Holland, J. G. (1985). The functional independence of mands and tacts. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 43, 5–19.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  16. Lane, H., & Schneider, B. (1963). Methods for self-shaping echoic behavior. Modern Language Journal, 41, 154–160.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Lanza, R., Starr, J., & Skinner, B. F. (1982). “Lying” in the pigeon. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 38, 201–203.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  18. Lee, V. L. (1981). Prepositional phrases spoken and heard. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 35, 227–242.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  19. Lee, V. L., & Pegler, A. M. (1982). Effects on spelling of training children to read. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 37, 311–322.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  20. Lubinski, D., & MacCorquodale, K. (1984). “Symbolic communication” between two pigeons (Columba livia) without unconditioned reinforcement. Journal of Comparative Psychology, 98, 372–380.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Lubinski, D., & Thompson, T. (1987). An animal model of the interpersonal communication of interoceptive (private) states. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 48, 1–15.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  22. Luciano, M.C. (1986). Acquisition, maintenance and generalization of productive intraverbal behavior through transfer of stimulus control procedures. Applied Research in Mental Retardation, 7, 1–20.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  23. MacCorquodale, K. (1969). B. F. Skinner’s Verbal behavior: A retrospective appreciation. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 12, 831–841.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  24. MacCorquodale, K. (1970). On Chomsky’s review of Skinner’s Verbal behavior. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 13, 83–99.CrossRefPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  25. McDowell, E. E. (1968). A programmed method of reading instruction for use with kindergarten children. The Psychological Record, 18, 233–239.Google Scholar
  26. McPherson, A., Bonem, M., Green, G., & Osborne, J. G. (1984). A citation analysis of the influence on research of Skinner’s Verbal behavior. The Behavior Analyst, 7, 157–167.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  27. Michael, J. L. (1982a). Distinguishing between discriminative and motivational functions of stimuli. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 37, 149–155.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  28. Michael, J. L. (1982b). Skinner’s elementary verbal relations: Some new categories. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 1, 1–3.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Michael, J. L. (1984). Verbal behavior. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 42, 363–376.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  30. Michael, J. L. (1985). Two kinds of verbal behavior plus a possible third. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 3, 2–5.Google Scholar
  31. Michael, J. L. (1988). Establishing operations and the mand. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 6, 3–9.PubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  32. Michael, J. L., Whitley, P., & Hesse, B. E. (1983). The pigeon parlance project. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 1, 6–9.Google Scholar
  33. Osgood, C. E. (1958). Verbal behavior, by B. F. Skinner, Contemporary Psychology, 3, 212–214.Google Scholar
  34. Peterson, N. (1978). An introduction to verbal behavior. Grand Rapids: Behavior Associates, Inc.Google Scholar
  35. Rogers-Warren, A., & Warren, S. (1980). Mands for verbalization: Facilitating the display of newly trained language in children. Behavior Modification, 4, 361–382.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Savage-Rumbaugh, S. E. (1984). Verbal behavior at a procedural level in the chimpanzee. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 41, 223–250.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  37. Sidman, M. (1971). The behavioral analysis of aphasia. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 8, 413–422.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  38. Sidman, M., Stoddard, L. T., Mohr, J. P., & Leicester, J. (1971). Behavioral studies of aphasia: Methods of investigation and analysis. Neuropsychologia, 9, 119–140.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  39. Simic, J., & Bucher, B. (1980). Development of spontaneous manding in nonverbal children. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 13, 523–528.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  40. Skinner, B. F. (1957). Verbal behavior. New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Skinner, B. F. (1978). Reflections on behaviorism and society. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
  42. Stafford, M. W., Sundberg, M. L., & Braam, S. J. (1988). A preliminary investigation of the consequences that define the mand and the tact. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 6, 61–71.PubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  43. Sundberg, M. L. (1985). Teaching verbal behavior to pigeons. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 3, 11–17.PubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  44. Sundberg, M. L., & Partington, J. W. (1982). Skinner’s Verbal behavior: A reference list. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 1, 9–13.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Sundberg, M. L., & Partington, J. W. (1983). Skinner’s Verbal behavior: An update on the 1982 reference list. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 2, 9–10.Google Scholar
  46. Vargas, E. A. (1982). Interverbal behavior: The codic, duplic and sequelic subtypes. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 1, 5–7.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Whitehurst, G. J. (1977). Comprehension, selective imitation, and the CIP hypothesis. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 23, 23–38.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. Yamamoto, J., & Mochizuki, A. (1988). Acquisition and functional analysis of manding with autistic students. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 21, 57–64.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • She-zeen Oah
    • 1
  • Alyce M. Dickinson
    • 1
  1. 1.Western Michigan UniversityUSA

Personalised recommendations