The Analysis of Verbal Behavior

, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp 25–41 | Cite as

On the relation between radical behaviorism and the science of verbal behavior

  • Sam Leigland
Article

Abstract

A fully-developed “science of verbal behavior” may depend upon a recognition of the implications of Skinner’s scientific system, radical behaviorism, particularly as it relates to the nature of scientific research. An examination of the system and Skinner’s own research practices imply, for example, that samples of vocal or written verbal behavior collected under controlling conditions may be observed as directly for the effects of controlling contingencies as in the traditional practice involving cumulative response records. Such practices may be defended on the basis of the pragmatic epistemology which characterizes radical behaviorism. An example of one type of exploratory method is described.

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Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sam Leigland
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyGonzaga UniversitySpokaneUSA

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