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The Analysis of Verbal Behavior

, Volume 4, Issue 1, pp 23–29 | Cite as

Psychological linguistics: A natural science approach to the study of language interactions

  • Sidney W. Bijou
  • John Umbreit
  • Patrick M. Ghezzi
  • Chia-Chen Chao
Article

Abstract

Kantor’s theoretical analysis of “psychological linguistics” offers a natural science approach to the study of linguistic behavior and interactions. This paper includes brief descriptions of (a) some of the basic assumptions of the approach, (b) Kantor’s conception of linguistic behavior and interactions, (c) a compatible research method and sample research data, and (d) some areas of research and application.

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Copyright information

© Association of Behavior Analysis International 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sidney W. Bijou
    • 1
  • John Umbreit
    • 1
  • Patrick M. Ghezzi
    • 1
  • Chia-Chen Chao
    • 1
  1. 1.College of EducationThe University of ArizonaTucsonUSA

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