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The Behavior Analyst

, Volume 20, Issue 1, pp 43–47 | Cite as

A Belated Response to Moxley

  • Hayne W. Reese
In Response
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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyWest Virginia UniversityMorgantownUSA

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