The Behavior Analyst

, Volume 19, Issue 1, pp 35–47 | Cite as

Distinguishing Between Applied Research and Practice

  • James M. Johnston
Article

Abstract

Behavior-analytic research is often viewed along a basic-applied continuum of research goals and methods. The applied portion of this continuum has evolved in ways that combine applied research and service delivery. Although these two facets of applied behavior analysis should be closely related, more clearly distinguishing between them, particularly in how we conceptualize and conduct applied research, may enhance the continuing development of each. This differentiation may improve the recruitment and training of graduate students.

Key words

basic research applied research applied behavior analysis graduate training 

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • James M. Johnston
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyAuburn UniversityAuburnUSA

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