Advertisement

The Behavior Analyst

, Volume 18, Issue 2, pp 341–354 | Cite as

Saving the World by Teaching Behavior Analysis: A Behavioral Systems Approach

  • Richard W. Malott
  • Pamela L. Vunovich
  • William Boettcher
  • Corina Groeger
Article

Abstract

This article presents a behavioral systems approach to organizational design and applies that approach to the teaching of behavior analysis. This systems approach consists of three components: goal-directed systems design, behavioral systems engineering, and performance management. This systems approach is applied to the Education Board and Teaching Behavior Analysis Special Interest Group of the Association for Behavior Analysis, with a conclusion that we need to emphasize the recruitment of students and the placement and maintenance of alumni. This systems approach is also applied at the scale of the individual faculty member running a university-based training system and is seen to generate special approaches to textbook preparation, undergraduate research, colloquium and conference attendance, career counseling, preparation for graduate examinations, graduate training and graduate seminars, and classroom alternatives to the traditional lecture.

Key words

college teaching behavior analysis training behavioral systems analysis 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Gilbert, T. F. (1978). Human competence: Engineering worthy performance. New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
  2. Greer, R. D. (1994). The measure of a teacher. In R. Gardner, D. M. Sainato, J. O. Cooper, T. E. Heron, W. L. Heward, J. Eshleman, & T. A. Grossi (Eds.), Behavior analysis in education: Focus on measurably superior instruction (pp. 161–171). Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole.Google Scholar
  3. Heward, W. L. (1994). Three “low-tech” strategies for increasing the frequency of active student responses during group instruction. In R. Gardner, D. M. Sainato, J. O. Cooper, T. E. Heron, W. L. Heward, J. Eshleman, & T. A. Grossi (Eds.), Behavior analysis in education: Focus on measurably superior instruction (pp. 283–320). Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole.Google Scholar
  4. Jackson, M., & Malott, R. W. (1994). Helping high-risk black college students. In R. Gardner, D. M. Sainato, J. O. Cooper, T. E. Heron, W. L. Heward, J. Eshleman, & T. A. Grossi (Eds.), Behavior analysis in education: Focus on measurably superior instruction (pp. 349–363). Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole.Google Scholar
  5. Malott, R. W. (1974). A behavioral systems approach to the design of human services. In D. Harshbarger & R. F. Maley (Eds.), Behavior analysis and systems analysis: An integrative approach to mental health programs (pp. 319–342). Kalamazoo, MI: Behaviordelia.Google Scholar
  6. Malott, R. W. (1992). Should we train applied behavior analysts to be researchers? Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 25, 83–88.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  7. Malott, R. W. (1995). Applied behavior analysis. Unpublished manuscript. Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo.Google Scholar
  8. Malott, R. W., & Garcia, M. E. (1987). A goal directed model approach for the design of human performance systems. Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, 9, 125–159.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Malott, R. W., Malott, M. E., & Shimamune, S. (1993). Comments on rule-governed behavior. Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, 12, 91–101.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Malott, R. W., Shimamune, S., & Malott, M. E. (1993). Rule-governed behavior and organizational behavior management: An analysis of interventions. Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, 12, 103–116.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Malott, R. W., Whaley, D. W., & Malott, M. E. (1993). Elementary principles of behavior (2nd ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
  12. Miller, J. M., Goodyear-Orwat, A., & Malott, R. W. (1995). The effects of intensive, extensive, structured study on GRE scores. Manuscript submitted for publication.Google Scholar
  13. Morris, E. K. (1993). Messages from the SABA President: Of funding and programs, other stuff and synergy. The ABA International Newsletter, 16(2), 3–7.Google Scholar
  14. Mowrer, O. H. (1947). On the dual nature of learning: A reinterpretation of “conditioning” and “problem solving.” Harvard Educational Review, 17, 103–148.Google Scholar
  15. Mowrer, O. H. (1960). Learning theory and behavior. New York: Wiley.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Shimamune, S. (1992). Experimental and theoretical analyses of instructional tasks: Reading, discrimination, and construction. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo.Google Scholar
  17. Skinner, B. F. (1948). Waiden two. New York: Macmillan.Google Scholar
  18. Skinner, B. F. (1953). Science and human behavior. New York: Macmillan.Google Scholar
  19. Vunovich, P. (1995). Discrimination training, terminal-response training, and concept learning in the teaching of goal-directed-systems-design. Unpublished master’s research, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard W. Malott
    • 1
  • Pamela L. Vunovich
    • 1
  • William Boettcher
    • 1
  • Corina Groeger
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyWestern Michigan UniversityKalamazooUSA

Personalised recommendations