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The Behavior Analyst

, Volume 18, Issue 1, pp 123–140 | Cite as

State Notation for Teaching About Behavioral Procedures

  • Jack Michael
  • Esther Shafer
Article

Abstract

Complex operant procedures are not easy to describe unambiguously and several abstract notation systems have been developed for such description. Although they have not been generally adopted, such systems could be especially valuable to the teacher and student of behavior analysis, functioning like other figures and graphs as visual aids to ordinary verbal description. One of these systems, state notation, is described in some detail, and examples are provided of its use in teaching about behavior analysis.

Key words

schedules of reinforcement state notation 

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jack Michael
    • 1
  • Esther Shafer
    • 2
  1. 1.Psychology DepartmentWestern Michigan UniversityKalamazooUSA
  2. 2.The Central School for Speech and DramaLondonEngland

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