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The Behavior Analyst

, Volume 17, Issue 2, pp 289–303 | Cite as

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: Altering the Verbal Support for Experiential Avoidance

  • Steven C. Hayes
  • Kelly G. Wilson
Article

Abstract

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a behavior-analytically-based psychotherapy approach that attempts to undermine emotional avoidance and increase the capacity for behavior change. An overview of this approach is given, followed by several specific examples of the techniques used within ACT. In each instance the behavioral rationale of these techniques is described. A contemporary view of verbal relations provides the basis for new approaches to adult outpatient psychotherapy.

Key words

rule-governed behavior emotions psychotherapy Acceptance and Commitment Therapy cognition 

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References

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven C. Hayes
    • 1
  • Kelly G. Wilson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of NevadaRenoUSA

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