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The Behavior Analyst

, Volume 16, Issue 2, pp 361–363 | Cite as

More Participation by Women in Behavior Analysis: Reply to Neef

  • David L. Myers
In Response

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References

  1. Astin, H. S. (1991). Citation classics: Women’s and men’s perceptions of their contributions to science. In H. Zuckerman, J. R. Cole, & J. T. Bruer (Eds.), The outer circle: Women in the scientific community (pp. 57–70). New York: Norton.Google Scholar
  2. Bronstein, P., & Pfennig, J. (1988). Misperceptions of women and affirmative action principles in faculty hiring: Response to Elliott’s comment on Bronstein et al. American Psychologist, 43, 668–669.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Fox, M. F. (1991). Gender, environmental milieu, and productivity in science. In H. Zuckerman, J. R. Cole, & J. T. Bruer (Eds.), The outer circle: Women in the scientific community (pp. 188–204). New York: Norton.Google Scholar
  4. Myers, D. L. (1993). Participation by women in behavior analysis. II: 1992. The Behavior Analyst, 16, 75–86.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  5. Over, R. (1982). Research productivity and impact of male and female psychologists. American Psychologist, 37, 24–31.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • David L. Myers
    • 1
  1. 1.Quality ImprovementGeorgia Mental Health Institute and Men Stopping ViolenceAtlantaUSA

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