The Behavior Analyst

, Volume 16, Issue 1, pp 117–121 | Cite as

ABA Accreditation of Graduate Programs of Study

  • B. L. Hopkins
  • J. Moore
Article

Abstract

ABA now offers accreditation for graduate programs of study in behavior analysis. Minimum standards include curriculum topics in (a) the principles of behavior, (b) within-subject research methodology and direct observation of behavior, (c) conceptual issues, and (d) behavioral interventions, as well as a thesis, dissertation, review paper, or general examination that is based on a behavior-analytic approach to problems or issues. Accreditation is viewed as one part of a process concerned with demonstrating that a person trained according to a given set of standards is more effective in utilizing the techniques of a science than a person who is not so trained.

Key words

accreditation ABA 

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. L. Hopkins
    • 1
  • J. Moore
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyAuburn UniversityAuburnUSA
  2. 2.University of Wisconsin-MilwaukeeMilwaukeeUSA

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