The Behavior Analyst

, Volume 15, Issue 2, pp 129–138 | Cite as

Variation and Selection: The Evolutionary Analogy and the Convergence of Cognitive and Behavioral Psychology

  • David L. Morgan
  • Robin K. Morgan
  • James M. Toth
Article

Abstract

The empirical and theoretical work of both operant and cognitive researchers has increasingly appealed to evolutionary concepts. In particular, both traditional operant studies of extinction-induced behavior and cognitive investigations of creativity and problem solving converge on the fundamental evolutionary principles of variation and selection. These contemporary developments and their implications for the alleged preparadigmatic status of psychology are discussed.

Key words

variation selection evolution problem solving creativity extinction 

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • David L. Morgan
    • 1
  • Robin K. Morgan
    • 2
  • James M. Toth
    • 1
  1. 1.Psychology DepartmentSpalding UniversityLouisvilleUSA
  2. 2.Indiana University SoutheastNew AlbanyUSA

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