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The Behavior Analyst

, Volume 14, Issue 2, pp 123–127 | Cite as

Shared Premises, Different Conclusions

  • David C. Palmer
  • John W. Donahoe
Article

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References

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • David C. Palmer
    • 1
  • John W. Donahoe
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologySmith CollegeNorthamptonUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MassachusettsAmherstUSA

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