The Behavior Analyst

, Volume 14, Issue 1, pp 15–18 | Cite as

Humble Behaviorism or Equal Doses of Skepticism?

  • Philip N. Chase
Article
  • 2 Downloads

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Chase, P. N., & Danforth, J. (1991). The role of rules in conceptual learning. In L. J. Hayes & P. N. Chase (Eds.), Dialogues on verbal behavior (pp. 205–225). Reno, NV: Context Press.Google Scholar
  2. Critchfield, T. S., & Perone, M. (1990). Verbal reports of delayed matching to sample by humans. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 53, 321–344.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  3. Ericsson, A. K., & Simon, H. A. (1984). Protocol analysis: Verbal reports as data. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  4. Hayes, S. C. (1986). The case of the silent dog—Verbal reports and the analysis of rules: A review of Ericsson and Simon’s Protocol analysis: Verbal reports as data. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 45, 351–363.CrossRefPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  5. Hayes, S. C., Brownstein, A. J., Zettle, R. D., Rosenfarb, I., & Korn, Z. (1986). Rule-governed behavior and sensitivity to changing consequences of responding. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 45, 237–256.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  6. Hayes, S. C., Zettle, R. D., & Rosenfarb, I. (1989). Rule-following. In S. C. Hayes (Ed.), Rule-governed behavior: Cognition, contingencies, and instructional control (pp. 191–220). New York: Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Hineline, P. N., & Wanchisen, B. A. (1989). Correlated hypothesizing and the distinction between contingency shaped and rule-governed behavior. In S. C. Hayes (Ed.), Rule-governed behavior: Cognition, contingencies, and instructional control (pp. 221–268). New York: Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Joyce, J. H., & Chase, P. N. (1990). The effects of response variability on the sensitivity of rule-governed behavior. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 54, 251–262.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  9. LeFrancois, J. R., Chase, P. N., & Joyce, J. H. (1988). The effects of a variety of instructions on the sensitivity of rule-governed behavior. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 49, 383–393.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  10. Matthews, B. A., Shimoff, E., Catania, A. C., & Sagvolden, T. (1977). Uninstructed human responding: Sensitivity to ratio and interval contingencies. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 27, 453–467.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  11. Perone, M., Galizio, M., & Baron, A. (1988). The relevance of animal-based principles in the laboratory study of human operant conditioning. In G. Davey & C. Cullen (Eds.), Human operant conditioning and behavior modification (pp. 59–85). Chichester, England: Wiley.Google Scholar
  12. Reese, H. W. (1989). Rules and rule governance: Cognitive and behavioral views. In S. C. Hayes (Ed.), Rule governed behavior: Cognition, contingencies, and instructional control (pp. 3–84). New York: Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Shimoff, E. (1984). Post-session questionnaires. Experimental Analysis of Human Behavior Bulletin, 2, 1.Google Scholar
  14. Shimoff, E. (1986). Post-session verbal reports and the experimental analysis of behavior. Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 4, 19–22.PubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  15. Sidman, M. (1960). Tactics of scientific research: Evaluating experimental data in psychology. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  16. Wanchisen, B. A., Tathum, T. A., & Mooney, S. E. (1989). Variable-ratio conditioning history produces high- and low-rate fixed-interval performance in rats. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 52, 167–179.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Philip N. Chase
    • 1
  1. 1.West Virginia UniversityMorgantownUSA

Personalised recommendations