The Behavior Analyst

, Volume 13, Issue 2, pp 163–165 | Cite as

What it Means to be a Scientist

  • J. M. Johnston
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References

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. M. Johnston
    • 1
  1. 1.Auburn UniversityAuburnUSA

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